Newsmakers

Newsmakers2020-05-06T13:25:58-05:00

Church fire could not extinguish the memories

A fire ripped through the Clinton Assembly of God Church this week, leaving behind decades of special memories in the rubble. Lines of cars, moving like a funeral procession showing respect for a friend, drove slowly past the fire scene as the ash smoldered for hours.  The church was once home to a daycare that helped many working parents stay employed. People recalled the activities they attended there as young church members.

And there were weddings and funerals.

In September 2003, the Assembly of God Church wrapped its arms around the community and the families of three children who lost their lives in a drowning incident at Clinton Lake.  No one who saw the three small, white caskets carrying Christopher Hamm, Austin Brown and Kyleigh Hamm will ever forget their funeral and the large crowd that gathered to escort them to the cemetery.

Churches open their doors in times of great joy and sorrow.  During that awful week in the fall of 2003 and countless other times, the Assembly of God Church has been there for the community and grieving families.

A huge part of the church may have been swallowed by the flames, but the love the church has extended, and the affection held by its members, cannot be extinguished.

 

 

Kirk Zimmerman case revisited

 

Before a McLean County jury acquitted Kirk Zimmerman of murder charges in 2019, residents of the Bloomington-Normal area were captivated by the case against the State Farm staffer accused of killing his ex-wife, Pam Zimmerman.

The case caught the attention of producers with NBC’s Dateline program.  The June 2019 episode on the Bloomington case will be rebroadcast on Friday, May 29, on local NBC affiliates at 9 p.m.

The show included portions of a lengthy interview with the couple’s twin daughters and son — all teens at the time their mother was killed in her east side Bloomington office. Pam Zimmerman’s neighbor and the office manager who were the first to locate her body riddled with multiple gunshot wounds described what they saw for the national audience.

I also was interviewed by Dateline host Keith Morrison for the program known for its focus on true crime. What struck me most about Dateline’s work on the Zimmerman story was the time they invested in learning about the case and the people involved. Courtroom footage from Zimmerman’s trial was available because a Dateline team was at the trial shooting video and taking exhaustive notes.

The interview process differed from the in-and-out style of most journalists.  I was in front of the cameras for most of the afternoon as Morrison, followed by producer Cassandra Marshall, quizzed me about the case. Most of those questions were based on their extensive knowledge of the case rather than written notes.

The second broadcast of the Bloomington case will also be reminder of all that was lost with the death of Pam Zimmerman, a dedicated mother and talented businesswoman who was loved and admired by those who knew her best.  The questions surrounding her death — why someone would want her dead and the likelihood of holding someone accountable for her death– remain unanswered.

If you missed the first run of the Dateline segment on the death of Pam Zimmerman and the long legal process against her former husband, it’s worth tuning in Friday night.

 

Death by pandemic a new worry for inmates

State prisons are among the places the coronavirus is spreading in our country. With testing happening on a limited basis and the obvious inability to social distance between inmates and staff, the novel virus has a strong foothold in penal institutions. Lawyers for inmates have filed lawsuits challenging the continued incarceration of medically vulnerable, elderly and low-level offenders.

Lawyers for inmates who have pending innocence claims have added a basis for requesting release of their clients: the possibility that an innocent person could die during the pandemic before their claim was resolved.

Here’s a link to the story I recently authored for WGLT on this issue:

https://www.wglt.org/post/jamie-snow-among-inmates-seeking-clemency-during-virus

 

 

How the internet has spread the stories behind wrongful convictions

The list of persons wrongfully convicted in the U.S. continues to grow.  Our criminal justice system is among the best in the world but it is not perfect. Any system run by humans has its share of errors and the justice system is no exception.  The ability of the internet to share information has allowed defendants to bring their stories to the world. A judicial process that mostly takes places before a nearly empty courtroom is now detailed online — complete with supporting documents and testimony. Podcasts, websites and audio recordings from defendants arguing their cases from behind bars all tell the story of those with innocence claims. Criminal justice researchers consider the internet a game changer for many defendants.

I recently wrote a piece for WGLT on how the internet has impacted post-conviction cases.  Here’s a link to the story.  As always, feedback is welcome.

https://www.wglt.org/post/internet-opens-door-wrongful-conviction-cases

Virus coverage overshadows most news as reporters become essential workers

Over the past two months, coverage of most news has taken a backseat to what’s going on with COVID-19, the novel virus that has claimed thousands of lives across the globe.  News outlets are struggling to keep up with the work of sharing the most updated news with an anxious public.  I recently posted my thoughts on Facebook.  Here’s a link to why support of journalism is so important:

http://https://www.facebook.com/pg/edithbradylunny/posts/?ref=page_internal

Sex offender registry holds many stories

The names and faces behind the nearly one million women, men and children on the nation’s sex offender registry represent untold stories of shattered lives left behind by the harm suffered by victims and their families as well as those whose crimes are posted for public display.

Women Against Registry is a St. Louis-area group of advocates who have taken on the task of supporting registrants — an unlikely cause in the minds of many people.  Last week I accompanied three members of the group to the Bloomington Police Department as they supported Charles Henderson, an 18-year registrant on the list, in his dispute with police.  His story illustrates the challenges of registrants as they navigate a world of assumptions by people who do not know their story.  To be clear, victims of sex crimes deserve justice and understanding.  But the devastation of such crimes often goes beyond the consequences to victims and their families.

Here’s a link to the story published on WGLT :

https://www.wglt.org/post/advocacy-group-challenges-sex-offender-rules

Tackling the tough issue of youth violence

The Bloomington-Normal area reported more than 50 incidents of gunfire in 2019.

Teens and young adults were involved in many of those cases.  I recently interviewed local youth minister Andrew Held and McLean County Public Defender Carla Barnes about their work in assessing what’s gone wrong in the lives of these young people.  Both are involved in efforts to move would-be offenders of gun laws to a path away from the criminal justice system.

Here’s a link to WGLT’s Sound Ideas segment: https://www.wglt.org/post/glt-sound-ideas-012020#stream/0

When women come home

The challenges facing women when they return home from jail and prison are complex and long lasting. An event sponsored recently by the Women’s Justice Initiative explored the reasons women find themselves behind bars and what can be done to help them start over.  Much is known about the differences between incarcerated men and women — nearly all women have suffered some form of sexual or physical abuse –but what can be done to deflect them from the pathway to prison is an ongoing challenge. Work by Deanne Benos and Alyssa Benedict, co-founders of the WJI, has educated players in the criminal justice system, women at risk of going to jail and the public about the root causes of the criminal activity that divides families and cripples a woman’s chance to succeed. Here’s a link to a story I authored for WGLT on the meeting:

Disrupting the pathway to prison

Rica’s story enters new phase with her father’s arrest

The story surrounding 8-year old Rica Rountree’s death continued this week wit the arrest of her father Richard Rountree.  He is charged with child endangerment to failing to protect her from the ongoing abuse he knew was being perpetrated on the child by his girlfriend Cindy Baker.  The arrest followed an emotional rally last week organized by Rica’s mother Ann Rountree, who clutched an urn holding Rica’s ashes as she spoke to supporters. Here’s a link to the story on Richard Rountree’s arrest authored by WGLT Content Editor Ryan Denham:

Richard Rountree arrested

Yet another tragic child death case

Even the most seasoned crime reporters cannot escape the recurring memories of certain autopsy photos and the story that comes along with them.  When the images depict a child — abused and tortured to the point of death– the time between viewing and a lessening impact on the memory can be longer than usual.

Such was the recent case I covered for WGLT involving the January 2019 death of Rica Rountree. A jury convicted Cindy Baker, the girlfriend of the 8-year-old victim’s father, of murder, aggravated battery of a child and child endangerment. A decision is expected shortly on potential charges against the father, Richard Rountree, who is shown on cell phone videos forcing the child to stand on her head as part of the couple’s bizarre and ongoing corporal punishment.

Before the trial, I collaborated with WGLT’s digital content editor Ryan Denham on an investigative piece on how Rica came to be in such a bad and dangerous place that eventually turned deadly. Here are links to the initial story and some of the trial coverage.  Comments welcome.

www.wglt.org/post/girl-testifies-she-saw-her-mother-abusing-rica-rountree

www.wglt.org/post/failing-rica-b-n-girls-death-exposes-holes-states-child-protection-system#stream/0

My interest in the criminal justice system continued….

after my June 2019 retirement from full-time journalism. Through my work as a correspondent with WGLT in Normal I have the opportunity to delve into those stories that make people think about how the system works and in some cases, fails.  The public’s knowledge of the courts and criminal justice system is often limited to what they know about a specific case, perhaps their own.  But beyond the day to day rulings and sentencings is a complex machine which never stops grinding and sifting the intricacies of the legal process.   Even the smallest tweak affects all layers of the legal system from how many people are arrested, who stays in jail and for how long to the size of the nation’s incarceration rate, still at a staggering two million inmates.

On October 23, Dr. David Olson presented a program to the Illinois Probation and Court Services Association on why data is an important tool in the work of probation officers.

Olsen’s news that arrests, crimes rates and the prison population are all down in Illinois seemed to surprise some probation officers in the room. Olson’s point?  When it comes to crime, the public’s perception is that things are getting worse, not better.  He included elected officials among those with that mistaken idea. Here’s a story I wrote for WGLT on the conference and Olson’s insightful research on what’s happening in the criminal justice arena in Illinois:

https://www.wglt.org/post/probation-officers-seek-new-tools-reduce-prison-numbers

Failing Rica is a story I co-authored with WGLT’s Digital Content Director Ryan Denham:

www.wglt.org/…/failing-rica-b-n-girls-death-exposes-holes-states-child -protection-system